Wellness Wednesday – A Baby Boomer’s Guide to a Five Star Retirement

Baby Boomers in Exercise Class

Bluebird Care, an Irish home care company, has published an infographic called A Baby Boomer’s Guide to a Five Star Retirement that offers tips on health and wellness, financial readiness, travel and culture, community service and personal development.

Here are five wellness tips:

1. Stay fit. Building as little as 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise is heart healthy and adds stamina and vigor.

2. Fitness activities that are aerobic and can be done with low impact on body joints are best. Consider swimming, cycling and yoga to keep in shape.

3. Don’t neglect exercises for the brain. Studies have shown that activities like crossword puzzles, sudoku and even reading the newspaper daily help keep the mind sharp and agile.

4. For some people, body parts do wear out. If this is the case, discuss alternatives with a GP. Knee and hip replacements are on the rise and helping older persons maintain an active lifestyle.

5. Eat wisely, but eat well. Focus on nutrient rich foods instead of supplemental vitamins. Be mindful of portion sizes and exercise moderation in alcohol consumption.”

Discover more tips by viewing A Baby Boomer’s Guide to a Five Star Retirement Infographic.

NOTE: If the infographic looks too small in your browser window, click on the graphic so it shows at 100%.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – The Rise and Fall of the Fitness Generation

Senior couple riding bicycles

In the AARP Magazine article The Rise and Fall of the Fitness Generation, author Sarah Mahoney shares why once-buff boomers are now confronting the blimp in the mirror:

“‘Baby boomers led an unprecedented fitness revolution, into a kind of golden era of health,’ says Kenneth H. Cooper, M.D., whose 1968 best-selling Aerobics put modern exercise on the map. In 1968, less than 24 percent of American adults exercised regularly; by 1984, that figure had risen to 59 percent. Cholesterol levels fell, and so did blood pressure. Deaths from heart disease plummeted 48 percent. And, in large part due to boomer mojo, the average life expectancy jumped from 69.7 years for those born in 1960 to 75.4 for those born in 1990, a huge gain.

By 1987 – the apex of the golden age of our abdominals — 69 percent of American adults were regular exercisers. Many boomers pursued fitness careers, becoming personal trainers. Others harnessed their workouts to change the world, with groundbreaking AIDS bike rides and breast cancer walks raising millions for worthy causes.

Then something strange happened. Boomers, once the peppiest generation, devolved from fit to flabby. Don’t take my word for it. JAMA Internal Medicine recently revealed that boomers are far less fit than their parents were at the same age and are more likely to have diabetes or high blood pressure. Today just 35 percent of boomers exercise regularly; 52 percent have no routine.”

Find out what happened.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Five Benefits of Meditation for Baby Boomers

Baby Boomer Couple Meditating

Meditation. It doesn’t have to be some hippy-like practice for which you travel to the high ground in India. In her article Five benefits of meditation for baby boomers, Marcia Smalley shares the benefits of “going within”:

“I started meditating two years ago. It’s safe to say this has changed my life.

At first I wanted to experience what all the fuss was about. If it was good enough for Oprah, then maybe there was something to it. But I was determined not to sit on a pillow in an awkward cross-legged position. I was 60, after all, and I wanted to be sure I could get up. Unassisted.

I also didn’t have a lot of time to devote to this.

Gratefully, neither a lot of time nor a pillow is required. I’ve discovered these benefits of even a few minutes of meditative silence.

Better Health

Since I began my practice, I’ve read the scientific evidence of its benefits. I knew from the beginning that meditation was beneficial. It just feels good. My heart rate slows. I release stress. I sleep better. I intuitively know that meditation is applying a salve to the inflammation that’s trying to ignite in me, physically and emotionally.

Love of the Present Moment

When in a meditative state, there’s only NOW.

At this time of life, when we’ve come to equate enjoyment with activities, to be able to drop into the joy of the present moment is truly sacred. There’s nothing sweeter than falling in love with the moment we’re given, the only one we have.

Increased Sensory Awareness

My meditation practice has shifted me into truly paying attention to everything around me. This has come as a surprise. At 60, you can get a little jaded. You can think you’ve seen it all, maybe done it all.

I notice things differently now. I have a greater appreciation of nature’s beauty, the intensity of color in our world, tantalizing aromas coming from the kitchen. Deeper gratitude for the outside world has been an unexpected gift.”

Discover more benefits of meditation for Baby Boomers.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – The Seven Dimensions of Wellness

Senior couple riding bicycles

The International Council on Active Aging® connects a community of like-minded organizations and professionals who share the goals of changing society’s perceptions of aging and improving the quality of life for aging Baby Boomers and older adults within the seven dimensions of wellness.

The concept of wellness moves the definition of health and well-being away from a mindset based in the management of disease and into the areas of prevention and proactive strategies.

Active aging embodies the philosophy that individuals can live as fully as possible within the seven dimensions of wellness:

Emotional

Feelings are the lens through which people view the world, and the ability to be aware of and direct one’s feelings helps to create balance in life. Coping with challenges and behaving in trustworthy and respectful ways signal emotional wellness, attributes that can be encouraged through peer counseling, stress management, humor/laughter and personal histories.

Intellectual, cognitive

Engaging in creative pursuits and intellectually stimulating activities is a proven approach to keeping minds alert and interested. There are many ways to stay intellectually active, including taking college courses, journaling, painting or joining a theater company, and challenging oneself with games and puzzles.

Physical

The goal of living independently is one shared by many people, and physical wellness is necessary to achieve this. Lifestyle choices that can maintain or improve health and functional ability include engaging in physical activity, choosing healthy foods with adequate nutrition, getting adequate sleep, managing stress, limiting alcohol intake, not smoking, making appointments for check-ups and following medical recommendations.

Click here to discover the additional ICAA four dimensions of wellness.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – 10 Essential Health Tips For Seniors

In the last census baby boomers, those 65+, accounted for 13% of the population. This age group grew at a faster rate than the population under age 45, and it’s clear that the US is an aging population. Happily, aging is different now than it was for our parents and grandparents. Today, there are more people living longer than at any other time in history. In fact, boomers will number 78 million by 2030. “This generation, associated with social change including the civil rights and anti-war movements in the 1960s, has another important cause—staying healthy,” says soon-to-be 65-year-old Arthur Hayward, MD, a geriatrician and clinical lead physician for Kaiser Permanente. “We need to become activists in promoting healthful behaviors and try our best to remain active and healthy the rest of our lives.”

How to do it? Dr. Hayward recommends these 10 easy health tips for seniors to help baby boomers live longer and thrive:

1. Quit smoking. Take this critical step to improve your health and combat aging. Smoking kills by causing cancer, strokes and heart failure. Smoking leads to erectile dysfunction in men due to atherosclerosis and to excessive wrinkling by attacking skin elasticity. Many resources are available to help you quit.

2. Keep active. Do something to keep fit each day—something you enjoy that maintains strength, balance and flexibility and promotes cardiovascular health. Physical activity helps you stay at a healthy weight, prevent or control illness, sleep better, reduce stress, avoid falls and look and feel better, too.

3. Eat well. Combined with physical activity, eating nutritious foods in the right amounts can help keep you healthy. Many illnesses, such as heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis, can be prevented or controlled with dietary changes and exercise. Calcium and vitamin D supplements can help women prevent osteoporosis.

4. Maintain a healthy weight. Extra weight increases your risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Use the Kaiser Permanente BMI (body mass index) calculator to find out what you should weigh for your height. Get to your healthy weight and stay there by eating right and keeping active. Replace sugary drinks with water—water is calorie free!

5. Prevent falls. We become vulnerable to falls as we age. Prevent falls and injury by removing loose carpet or throw rugs. Keep paths clear of electrical cords and clutter, and use night-lights in hallways and bathrooms. Did you know that people who walk barefoot fall more frequently? Wear shoes with good support to reduce the risk of falling.

6. Stay up-to-date on immunizations and other health screenings. By age 50, women should begin mammography screening for breast cancer. Men can be checked for prostate cancer. Many preventive screenings are available. Those who are new to Medicare are entitled to a “Welcome to Medicare” visit and all Medicare members to an annual wellness visit. Use these visits to discuss which preventative screenings and vaccinations are due.

7. Prevent skin cancer. As we age, our skin grows thinner; it becomes drier and less elastic. Wrinkles appear, and cuts and bruises take longer to heal. Be sure to protect your skin from the sun. Too much sun and ultraviolet rays can cause skin cancer.

8. Get regular dental, vision and hearing checkups. Your teeth and gums will last a lifetime if you care for them properly—that means daily brushing and flossing and getting regular dental checkups. By age 50, most people notice changes to their vision, including a gradual decline in the ability to see small print or focus on close objects. Common eye problems that can impair vision include cataracts and glaucoma. Hearing loss occurs commonly with aging, often due to exposure to loud noise.

9. Manage stress. Try exercise or relaxation techniques—perhaps meditation or yoga—as a means of coping. Make time for friends and social contacts and fun. Successful coping can affect our health and how we feel. Learn the role of positive thinking.

10. Fan the flame. When it comes to sexual intimacy and aging, age is no reason to limit your sexual enjoyment. Learn about physical changes that come with aging and get suggestions to help you adjust to them, if necessary.

 

SOURCE

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Heat Stroke vs. Heat Exhaustion – What is the Difference?

Thermometer and Sun Depicintg Summer HeatHeat Stroke

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body`s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea

Heat Exhaustion

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids.

Warning signs vary but may include the following:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle Cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Skin: may be cool and moist
  • Pulse rate: fast and weak
  • Breathing: fast and shallow

 

Read more Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – 8 Healthy, White Foods

bowl of yogurtYes, even a few carbs made the list!

Colorful fruits and vegetables might get all the love, but some white foods have terrific health benefits, too. Thanks to the folks at AARP, here are a few white foods to add to your shopping cart.

Find out more about the 8 healthy white foods

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Tips for Staying Healthy as You Age

The Importance of Mobility for Aging Well

As quoted in an April 15 Washington Post article by Steven Petrow, Miriam C. Morey, professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine and senior fellow in its Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development has advice for seniors who want to maintain their mobility as they age:

“As you get into the older age bracket, you need to reset your thinking in terms of whatever you’ve been doing and what you want to do in the future. We need to transition into thinking about mobility, how to augment or enhance it.

From an exercise point, ask: Are my legs strong enough? Can I get out of my chair without using my hand to help?

Do a simple test: Put your arms across your chest and see if you can get out of the chair without using your arms.

Also, what is my balance like, because once you reach this age [many] start to lose their balance. Can you stand on one leg? Start practicing.

You should think about your strength because that’s one of the most important thing about maintaining your independence. Do less cardio and do more things for strength — lower- and upper-body.”

Read the rest of the article

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582