Freedom Friday: Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018

In the article, Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018, author Richard D’Ambrosio reports that the percentage of Boomers saying they want to relax and rejuvenate on vacation jumped from 38 percent last year to 49 percent in 2017.

Where and why Boomers are traveling. According to the most recent AARP Travel survey, Boomers most likely are taking a ‘bucket list’ trip (22 percent). In other findings, 49 percent of respondents said they only expect to travel domestically in 2018 — and Florida and California are the most popular U.S. destinations. The other half (47 percent) plan to travel domestically and internationally. Top choices for those going abroad are the Caribbean/Latin America and Europe.

How Boomers are traveling. For those who travel in the U.S., trips are mostly summer vacations, multigenerational travel or weekend getaways. About 66 percent of Boomers travel domestically by plane and 60 percent by car.”

Read the rest at Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – The Best Tips for Health in Spring

In the article Senior Wellness: The Best Tips for Health in Spring, author Melissa Woodward offer advice on how you can rejuvenate your life this spring, after a long winter:

Take Yourself in for a Tune Up. To keep your body running at peak performance, it needs regular maintenance: a spring tune-up, so to speak. Get your weight, blood pressure, and glucose and cholesterol levels checked out by your primary-care physician, who can also book you for other relevant tests. In addition, if it’s been a year since your eyes were tested, schedule an appointment with your optometrist, and see your dentist if you haven’t been examined for at least six to nine months. Finally, if you are finding it difficult to catch what people are saying, especially in a crowd of people, it’s probably time to get your hearing tested.

Lighten Up Your Diet. Many healthy fruits and veggies, like asparagus, peas, lettuce, and strawberries come into season in the spring, making it the perfect time to replace heavier winter meals with salads, light soups or other lightly cooked fare. In fact, cut down your chances of developing conditions, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and arthritis, by making a complete dietary overhaul. Consider cutting down on red meat and processed foods, replacing white flour with whole grain flour, and increasing your intake of produce as well as healthy fats such as olive oil and avocados. Remember that you should never undertake a new diet or exercise plan without consulting your doctor about what will be safe for your current level of health.

Read the rest: Senior Wellness: The Best Tips for Health in Spring

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: More Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better

Baby Boomer Couple in CityIn the Reader’s Digest article, 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better, author Michelle Seitzer describes what baby boomers want when it comes to senior living:

The city life. Experts are seeing a surge in popularity among urban housing options and settings for retirees, who are no longer worried about school districts, parking, and other metro area drawbacks typically associated with parents of young children. A city’s “walkability” is an important consideration here as well, both in terms of walking distance and ease of walking (for those who may have mobility issues now or later). That way, seniors can take advantage of these health benefits of a quick, 15-minute walk.

A wired world. Wi-Fi is not a luxury but a necessity. Boomers and seniors are the fastest growing online demographic, so they’ll need to stay connected. Besides, how else will they be able to Skype with the grandchildren or post pictures from last night’s wine and cheese social to Facebook? After all, science says loneliness is even deadlier than obesity.

Staying at home longer. Senior living is great, but staying at home is even better. Nearly 75 percent of adults hope to stay in their current homes as long as possible, according to an AARP survey. And thanks to “universal design,” with features like stair-less entryways and easy-to-flip light switches, seniors can live in their homes longer than ever. (Check out these other ways to make a home safe as you age.)

Better transportation. Even if they can’t drive, seniors don’t want to be stuck in the same place all day. Assisted living facilities almost always offer vans to make it easy for residents to go shopping or make a lunch date with friends, without feeling guilty about asking for a ride. Find out how to tell if your loved one should stop driving.”

Read the rest at 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Take The Heart-Smart Menu Quiz

Group of fresh fruits and vegetables

What’s worse for your ticker: a hot dog or a hamburger? What’s healthier: a spinach salad or one made from kale? AARP has teamed up with the experts at the American Heart Association to uncover amazingly simple swaps that will boost your health – effortlessly.

Think you know which is best for you? Take the AARP-AHA menu quiz now to find out.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better

Senior couple riding bicyclesIn the Reader’s Digest article, 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better, author Michelle Seitzer describes what baby boomers want when it comes to senior living:

1. Pets welcome. Whether seniors know these health benefits of having a pet or just love their furry friends, they aren’t giving up their pets anytime soon. If Fido can’t go, they’ll pass. But it’s not enough for Fido to just come along; boomers are looking for amenities for their best furry friends too. Think doggie spas and fenced-in runs.

2. Pamper me. The sterile hospital feel is so retro, and not in a good way. Tomorrow’s senior housing consumers want it to look and feel like they’re on vacation, and in a sleek, contemporary setting (modern is in). Don’t forget the robust list of amenities: Boomers want to have ample choices, more services, maybe even chocolates on their pillows. We recommend senior housing facilities take a cue from these tricks to make overnight guests feel more comfortable.

3. More space, please. On the whole, downsizing is not in their vocabulary. Most boomer consumers want space for all their stuff, a dedicated place to entertain new and old friends, and plenty of room for the grandkids to visit. Senior living is moving away from studios and toward more one-bedroom options. (If your place feels too small to have people over, steal these tips for entertaining in a small space.)

4. Anti-boredom. Yes, they want to play golf, but boomers want to be active in other ways—sports or not—“on-campus” and off. (Just look at these inspiring senior athletes for proof!) They want workshops to tinker in, gardens to cultivate, and volunteer opportunities in which to be engaged. They want fitness centers and a social wellness calendar packed with Zumba, yoga, pottery, guest lectures, concerts, computer classes, mixers and more—like these 10 ways to keep your brain sharp as you age.”

Read the rest at 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Three Fitness Tips to Put the Boom Back in Baby Boomers in 2018

Baby Boomer Couple on BicyclesBaby boomers whose exercise routines have gone bust may be thinking about putting the boom— and a little sweat— back into their lives as they ponder New Year’s resolutions for 2018.

In the article Three Fitness Tips to Put the Boom Back in Baby Boomers in 2018, out-of-shape boomers who want to lose weight, feel better, look better, get fit and put that boom back in their lives can use these simple exercises recommended by Jaime Brenkus, a nationally recognized fitness expert:

Sit and get fit. Four easy moves you can do on a chair will give you a slimmer, trimmer and tighter waistline. Do at least 20 repetitions of each exercise. For the first, place your hands behind your head, crunch forward and then lean back as far as you can while keeping your feet on the ground. For the second, you can do side bends. Place your hands behind your head again, but this time alternate bending from one side to the other. For the third, rotate your body side to side with more twists. Finally, scoot to the edge of the chair. Bring both knees into your chest and then lower your legs to the starting position.

Round-the-world lunges. You will do a forward, a side and a reverse lunge. Perform each in one movement. (1.) Forward lunge. Stand with your feet together and back straight. Place your left hand on a chair for balance and support. Slowly take a big step forward with the right foot. Lower your body until your right thigh is parallel to the floor and your right shin is vertical. Then move back to the starting position. (2.) Side lunge. Slowly step to the side with your right foot about 3 feet and squat so your thighs are parallel to the ground. Move back to the starting position. (3.) Reverse lunge. Slowly step back with your right foot about 3 feet. Bend both knees and lower yourself until your left thigh is parallel with the ground. Return to starting position.

Morning rituals. Brenkus says he starts each morning with fitness moves that work the entire body. The first is push ups. Start with an amount you’re comfortable with. For example, if you do 10 every day, that adds up to 300 for the month. If you’re a beginner, it’s okay to start your push ups by doing them on a wall. Next are squats. Your feet should be shoulder width apart. With your abs held tight and your back straight, slowly lower yourself into a seating position until your bottom touches a seat. Make sure your knees don’t go past your toes and are aligned straight. If just starting out, try quarter to half squats where you’re not bending down as far. ”

Read the whole article: Three Fitness Tips to Put the Boom Back in Baby Boomers in 2018.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs

Retire Abroad Word MontageIn the Next Avenue article, Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs, author Kathleen Peddicord provides advice on everything from Medicare abroad to working overseas:

If I live overseas, would I lose my original citizenship? No, your residency status abroad has no effect on your citizenship. Residency and citizenship are two different things. If you’re a U.S. citizen, the only way to lose your U.S. citizenship is to renounce it formally. This is a serious step that you can’t take accidentally. In other words, there’s no chance you’d lose your U.S. citizenship without realizing it. Renouncing it requires a formal application and at least one interview with the FBI. Once your application to renounce your citizenship has been approved, you then must appear again before federal authorities to relinquish your blue passport with the eagle on the cover. The United States doesn’t want to lose you as one of its citizens, for, as long as you carry U.S. citizenship, no matter where you roam, you are obliged to report your income and earnings to Uncle Sam.

Can I still receive my U.S. Social Security payments? Yes. If you’re eligible for Social Security, you can even have your monthly check direct-deposited into your account in some countries. See this link for a list of countries where this is possible.

Will Medicare cover me living overseas? No. No exceptions. As an American abroad, you need to make another plan for covering your medical expenses overseas. I recommend, though, keeping your Medicare as a major medical backup.

Can I drive on my home country’s driver’s license? Yes, typically for the first 30 days to one year that you’re resident in a new country.

Can I get a job? Probably not. To work in a foreign country, you’ll need a work visa. This is not easily obtained unless you’re sponsored for a job by an international employer and relocated to the country with its help. The one exception to this general rule right now is Panama. This country’s Friendly Nations visa program bundles the possibility of a work permit. Ecuador and the Dominican Republic allow you to work by just obtaining legal residency. Belize allows you to work if you go the permanent residency route rather than QRP. In many places in the world, however, you can start your own business. The easiest is a laptop-based enterprise.”

Read more at Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – More Secrets to a Long Life from Ancestral Greek Islanders

Greek Island SantoriniIn the Next Avenue article Secrets From the Island Where People Forget to Die, author Laine Bergeson writes about the remarkable longevity of the residents of the Greek island of Ikaria:

“On the Greek island of Ikaria, people forget to die.

For the most part, they also forget to get sick – the island’s many nonagenarians experience relatively little cancer, cardiovascular disease or dementia.

This small island in the north Aegean Sea has been the subject of much study by researchers across the world. Every outsider wonders: What is the secret to a long and healthy life?

In her cookbook Ikaria: Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity from the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die, ancestral Ikarian and part-time resident of the island, Diane Kochilas, offers an insider’s perspective on why this far-flung Greek community lives so long and so well.”

In a previous article, we reported on four of Kochilas’ longevity tips. Here are two more:

5. Turn to herbs for most of the minor things that ail you and let your body heal itself. The folk pharmacopoeia is vast on the island, and I’ve only touched the tip of the iceberg in the book.

6. Walk. Plain and simple. Exercise for priming body and mind alike. Every old person I know on Ikaria still walks a lot.”

Read the whole article: Secrets From the Island Where People Forget to Die.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: More Advice in 2018 for the Nearly Retired

Four colored price stickers on the worn wooden backgroundIn the Market Watch article, 9 New Year’s Resolutions for the Nearly Retired, author Alessandra Malito suggests that if you are planning to retire in 2018, there are some important resolutions you should make now:

Get the important documents settled. Even at your healthiest, or when you’re struggling to save money, wills and other life documents, such as a power of attorney, are important, especially if you want your wishes to be followed. ‘Don’t leave your family with difficult decisions and scrambling to piece together your finances,’ said James White, a financial adviser and founder of J.H. White Financial in Pottstown, Penn. Know who you want to make the medical decisions, who should be executor of your estate and how to divide your assets. And, though it seems morbid, write out a safely stored document with all the important information you know that your family may need, such as all financial accounts, passwords to social media and other websites and even family recipes they may want, to keep your family’s legacy alive.

Declutter. Getting rid of possessions can be a tedious process, but it frees up space in your home — and could do the same in your mind. ‘By simplifying your life early in retirement, you’re not only freeing up space in your home, but you’re able to take your time to examine what’s most meaningful to you and release anything that no longer serves you,’ said Penny Gordon, senior vice president and private wealth adviser at Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust in East Berlin, Penn. Having a clean slate is just as important as getting your financial house in order, she said (and it could make downsizing homes in the future easier, too). The items that no longer mean much to you may mean a great deal to a family member, friend or charity organization, Gordon added. Some may want to follow Marie Kondo’s method of decluttering, where she puts everything of one category (such as clothes, books or linens) on the floor and picks them up one by one to see which “spark joy” and which don’t. When something is no longer important, you’re supposed to thank the item for its time and find a new place for it (outside of your life).

Know your benefits. Educate yourself on what your company gives you in retirement, including how your retirement accounts are invested and if you get any health benefits. About a quarter of employers who provide health insurance also offer some sort of financial help with medical needs (though that share of employers used to be a lot higher — 60% in the 1980s). Along with what employers offer, it’s important to know what the government will give you. Social Security benefit checks are expected to shrink in a few decades, because there are more people currently retiring than there are people entering the workforce. If you haven’t already, create an account with the Social Security Administration at My Social Security to ensure work history and personal information is current, view Social Security benefit statements or see what you should expect to receive in the future.”

Read more at 9 New Year’s Resolutions for the Nearly Retired.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Six Secrets to a Long Life from Ancestral Greek Islanders

Greek Island SantoriniIn the Next Avenue article Secrets From the Island Where People Forget to Die, author Laine Bergeson writes about the remarkable longevity of the residents of the Greek island of Ikaria:

“On the Greek island of Ikaria, people forget to die.

For the most part, they also forget to get sick – the island’s many nonagenarians experience relatively little cancer, cardiovascular disease or dementia.

This small island in the north Aegean Sea has been the subject of much study by researchers across the world. Every outsider wonders: What is the secret to a long and healthy life?

In her cookbook Ikaria: Lessons on Food, Life, and Longevity from the Greek Island Where People Forget to Die, ancestral Ikarian and part-time resident of the island, Diane Kochilas, offers an insider’s perspective on why this far-flung Greek community lives so long and so well.”

Here are some of Kochilas’ longevity tips:

1. Eat locally, seasonally and sparingly. The octagenarians, nonagenarians and centenarians I spoke with on Ikaria all described the eating habits of their early years — years of dire poverty, dearth and isolation — not so much in terms of what they ate but of how little they ate, because there simply wasn’t that much food.

Meat was rare, for some as rare as two to three times a year on the big holidays. For others who may have had animals (mainly chickens), they could afford to slaughter a few times a month. Fish was accessible if one fished; gardens were carved into terraces along Ikaria’s steep slopes and watered sparingly.

The 100-year-olds ate what they found in nature, from snails to mushrooms to wild greens, as well as what their gardens provided. There was and is still virtually no processed food on the island, except in some restaurants.

2. Live deliberately and don’t rush. The pace with which people move on Ikaria (including my own family!) never ceases to amaze me: slow, deliberate, unhurried, but with enough time to observe and live in every moment.

3. Enjoy sleep. We sleep so much when we are on Ikaria. It’s a godsend. I don’t know if it’s the atmosphere or the clean air, but I can sleep there totally soundly for 10 hours, even with daylight pouring into the room. Ikarians nap. All older Greeks nap.

4. Let things go. The Greeks say, ‘Don’t hold the bad in.’ There is so much truth and wisdom in that. Ikaria is a place where people tend to be easygoing, forgiving and unstressed. It’s also a place where the local culture allows for a very liberal interpretation of what it means to be uninhibited. The panygyria, local feasts of wine and dancing that are usually in celebration of a saint’s name day, are the place to witness how we let loose and enjoy it. Dancing has a lot to do with it. So does the strength of the local wine.

Read the rest of the tips: Secrets From the Island Where People Forget to Die.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582