Freedom Friday: Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018

In the article, Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018, author Richard D’Ambrosio reports that the percentage of Boomers saying they want to relax and rejuvenate on vacation jumped from 38 percent last year to 49 percent in 2017.

Where and why Boomers are traveling. According to the most recent AARP Travel survey, Boomers most likely are taking a ‘bucket list’ trip (22 percent). In other findings, 49 percent of respondents said they only expect to travel domestically in 2018 — and Florida and California are the most popular U.S. destinations. The other half (47 percent) plan to travel domestically and internationally. Top choices for those going abroad are the Caribbean/Latin America and Europe.

How Boomers are traveling. For those who travel in the U.S., trips are mostly summer vacations, multigenerational travel or weekend getaways. About 66 percent of Boomers travel domestically by plane and 60 percent by car.”

Read the rest at Baby Boomers Want to Relax and Rejuvenate in 2018.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: Best Moving Tips of All Time

Baby Boomer Couple with Moving Professionals

The article Top 50 Moving Hacks of All Time, contains 50 tips that can help you stay ahead of moving woes.

Try these:

1. For the 2-3 weeks leading up to your move, plan your meals around whatever frozen food, perishable items, or half open containers that you have around the kitchen.

2. Schedule your move for the middle of the month or the middle of the week to cut costs. It’s cheaper to move then!

3. To make picture frames more stable and protect your walls from scuffing, cut off pencil erasers and glue them to the back of the frame before hanging it up.

4. Wrap a rubber band around a hammer to prevent scuffing the wall when removing nails.

5. If you use plastic wrap, you can leave your items in whichever container or storage bin they’re in. For example, simply wrap your utensils organizer with plastic wrap instead of letting your forks and knives run loose in a box!

Read the rest of the tips at Top 50 Moving Hacks of All Time.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: More Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better

Baby Boomer Couple in CityIn the Reader’s Digest article, 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better, author Michelle Seitzer describes what baby boomers want when it comes to senior living:

The city life. Experts are seeing a surge in popularity among urban housing options and settings for retirees, who are no longer worried about school districts, parking, and other metro area drawbacks typically associated with parents of young children. A city’s “walkability” is an important consideration here as well, both in terms of walking distance and ease of walking (for those who may have mobility issues now or later). That way, seniors can take advantage of these health benefits of a quick, 15-minute walk.

A wired world. Wi-Fi is not a luxury but a necessity. Boomers and seniors are the fastest growing online demographic, so they’ll need to stay connected. Besides, how else will they be able to Skype with the grandchildren or post pictures from last night’s wine and cheese social to Facebook? After all, science says loneliness is even deadlier than obesity.

Staying at home longer. Senior living is great, but staying at home is even better. Nearly 75 percent of adults hope to stay in their current homes as long as possible, according to an AARP survey. And thanks to “universal design,” with features like stair-less entryways and easy-to-flip light switches, seniors can live in their homes longer than ever. (Check out these other ways to make a home safe as you age.)

Better transportation. Even if they can’t drive, seniors don’t want to be stuck in the same place all day. Assisted living facilities almost always offer vans to make it easy for residents to go shopping or make a lunch date with friends, without feeling guilty about asking for a ride. Find out how to tell if your loved one should stop driving.”

Read the rest at 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: Downsizing Baby Boomers – Is It Better to Rent or to Buy?

Baby Boomer Couple Talking with Financial Advisor

In the Washington Post article Downsizing baby boomers face a key decision: Is it better to rent or to buy?, author Michele Lerner writes that the rent-or-buy decision affects people nearing retirement:

“The rent-or-buy decision is more commonly thought of as a dilemma for young professionals establishing their households, not people approaching retirement. But whether it’s a financially savvy decision or simply the only solution when they can’t find a suitable place to buy, some baby boomers are choosing to rent an apartment downtown when they downsize.”

Some advice:

“Understand your goals. Many baby boomers who think they want to downsize into a city condo are surprised that it will cost them as much to buy a condo as they would pay for a house, says Ellen Sandler, a real estate agent with Evers & Co. Real Estate in Washington. ‘Some decide to rent to get the services and lifestyle they want, especially if they have enough assets to throw off enough income to pay the rent,’ Sandler says.

Investment options for renters. Tim Hewitt, a senior wealth adviser with the Wiley Group in Conshohocken, Pa., as well as a licensed real estate agent with United Real Estate in Wayne, Pa. says that 80 percent of his clients don’t want to rent because they don’t want to lose control over their home to a landlord and don’t want the possibility of paying higher rent in the future. ‘Those clients that choose to buy tend to make a large down payment or buy with cash from the equity from the sale of their home. and then try to cover their property taxes, insurance and maintenance costs with their Social Security or pension income,’ Hewitt says. ‘They can use their investment income for discretionary spending.'”

Read more at Downsizing baby boomers face a key decision: Is it better to rent or to buy?.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better

Senior couple riding bicyclesIn the Reader’s Digest article, 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better, author Michelle Seitzer describes what baby boomers want when it comes to senior living:

1. Pets welcome. Whether seniors know these health benefits of having a pet or just love their furry friends, they aren’t giving up their pets anytime soon. If Fido can’t go, they’ll pass. But it’s not enough for Fido to just come along; boomers are looking for amenities for their best furry friends too. Think doggie spas and fenced-in runs.

2. Pamper me. The sterile hospital feel is so retro, and not in a good way. Tomorrow’s senior housing consumers want it to look and feel like they’re on vacation, and in a sleek, contemporary setting (modern is in). Don’t forget the robust list of amenities: Boomers want to have ample choices, more services, maybe even chocolates on their pillows. We recommend senior housing facilities take a cue from these tricks to make overnight guests feel more comfortable.

3. More space, please. On the whole, downsizing is not in their vocabulary. Most boomer consumers want space for all their stuff, a dedicated place to entertain new and old friends, and plenty of room for the grandkids to visit. Senior living is moving away from studios and toward more one-bedroom options. (If your place feels too small to have people over, steal these tips for entertaining in a small space.)

4. Anti-boredom. Yes, they want to play golf, but boomers want to be active in other ways—sports or not—“on-campus” and off. (Just look at these inspiring senior athletes for proof!) They want workshops to tinker in, gardens to cultivate, and volunteer opportunities in which to be engaged. They want fitness centers and a social wellness calendar packed with Zumba, yoga, pottery, guest lectures, concerts, computer classes, mixers and more—like these 10 ways to keep your brain sharp as you age.”

Read the rest at 8 Ways Baby Boomers Have Made Senior Living SO Much Better.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: How Mom Can Get In On the Home-Sharing Economy

Elderly Lady with Nurse at Assisted Living Facility

In the Next Avenue article How You Can Get In On the Home-Sharing Economy, author Chris Farrell gives us a peek at the cottage industry, plus one man’s home-sharing story:

“Survey after survey shows that Americans want to remain in their own homes as they get older; it’s called ‘aging in place.’ Failing that, they’d like to live in someone else’s home – just not an institutional nursing home. Turns out, you may be able to make some money from this wish by launching a home-sharing operation or just renting out part of your own home.

Here’s the basic idea. Home-sharing programs — often managed by nonprofits — match older homeowners (sometimes empty nesters) who could use extra income with older local people looking for a reduced rent, usually in exchange for helping around the house. For instance, monthly apartment rents in Ann Arbor, Mich. average $1,300 to $1,400 a month, while the average home-share rent is $400 to $500, says Kim McKitrick-Thompson, head of the Housing Bureau for Seniors HomeShare Program in Ann Arbor, Mich.”

What is it like to share your home?

“Earl Roy, 81, lives in Ann Arbor, Mich. and has shared his home with several housemates over the past five years or so. ‘It has worked out for me,’ he says.

Roy, a former civil engineer who spent most of his career building and maintaining supermarkets, wanted to stay in his home. His wife didn’t. So they separated and she moved into a small condo complex in town. But Roy couldn’t afford to keep his place without extra cash to pay for it. He turned to the area’s Seniors HomeShare Program to match him up with renters.

‘I needed the income,’ he says. ‘And I don’t really like living by myself.’

Read more of Earl’s story at How You Can Get In On the Home-Sharing Economy.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs

Retire Abroad Word MontageIn the Next Avenue article, Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs, author Kathleen Peddicord provides advice on everything from Medicare abroad to working overseas:

If I live overseas, would I lose my original citizenship? No, your residency status abroad has no effect on your citizenship. Residency and citizenship are two different things. If you’re a U.S. citizen, the only way to lose your U.S. citizenship is to renounce it formally. This is a serious step that you can’t take accidentally. In other words, there’s no chance you’d lose your U.S. citizenship without realizing it. Renouncing it requires a formal application and at least one interview with the FBI. Once your application to renounce your citizenship has been approved, you then must appear again before federal authorities to relinquish your blue passport with the eagle on the cover. The United States doesn’t want to lose you as one of its citizens, for, as long as you carry U.S. citizenship, no matter where you roam, you are obliged to report your income and earnings to Uncle Sam.

Can I still receive my U.S. Social Security payments? Yes. If you’re eligible for Social Security, you can even have your monthly check direct-deposited into your account in some countries. See this link for a list of countries where this is possible.

Will Medicare cover me living overseas? No. No exceptions. As an American abroad, you need to make another plan for covering your medical expenses overseas. I recommend, though, keeping your Medicare as a major medical backup.

Can I drive on my home country’s driver’s license? Yes, typically for the first 30 days to one year that you’re resident in a new country.

Can I get a job? Probably not. To work in a foreign country, you’ll need a work visa. This is not easily obtained unless you’re sponsored for a job by an international employer and relocated to the country with its help. The one exception to this general rule right now is Panama. This country’s Friendly Nations visa program bundles the possibility of a work permit. Ecuador and the Dominican Republic allow you to work by just obtaining legal residency. Belize allows you to work if you go the permanent residency route rather than QRP. In many places in the world, however, you can start your own business. The easiest is a laptop-based enterprise.”

Read more at Want to Retire Abroad? Answers to 14 FAQs.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: How to Reduce Stress When Planning a Manageable Move

Baby Boomer Couple with Moving Professionals

According to the advice in the AARP article How to Plan for a Manageable Move, the first step is to decide what to take and what to leave. The process can be stressful and exhausting for everyone involved.

Here are some tips on how to make the process a bit easier:

Tips for Minimizing Stress

  • Parting with beloved items can be easier when they’re given to a beloved family member.
  • Note to recipient: Even if you don’t want the china, take the china. For your loved one, thinking that you will use and love the china is a comfort at a time when comfort is needed. Say thank you. Put it aside for six months. If no one in the family wants it, quietly consign or donate.
  • Phrases like “You don’t need that! It’s junk!” are not helpful. When the to-go pile swells, offer a gentle “This-one-or-that-one?” choice.
  • Sketch a to-scale map of the floor plan in your loved one’s new home. Cut to-scale rectangles, squares and circles to represent furniture. Your loved one can see what will and won’t fit without being told.
  • Focus on the upside. “What are you going to do with the money you make from selling the patio furniture?”
  • If your loved one is going to a community for the aging and he or she has a sturdy outdoor bench or birdbath, ask if it could be used on the grounds.
  • Take hourly breaks.
  • When your loved one has finished deciding what to jettison, urge a short rest. Use the time to bag donations.

Read more at How to Plan for a Manageable Move.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: More Advice in 2018 for the Nearly Retired

Four colored price stickers on the worn wooden backgroundIn the Market Watch article, 9 New Year’s Resolutions for the Nearly Retired, author Alessandra Malito suggests that if you are planning to retire in 2018, there are some important resolutions you should make now:

Get the important documents settled. Even at your healthiest, or when you’re struggling to save money, wills and other life documents, such as a power of attorney, are important, especially if you want your wishes to be followed. ‘Don’t leave your family with difficult decisions and scrambling to piece together your finances,’ said James White, a financial adviser and founder of J.H. White Financial in Pottstown, Penn. Know who you want to make the medical decisions, who should be executor of your estate and how to divide your assets. And, though it seems morbid, write out a safely stored document with all the important information you know that your family may need, such as all financial accounts, passwords to social media and other websites and even family recipes they may want, to keep your family’s legacy alive.

Declutter. Getting rid of possessions can be a tedious process, but it frees up space in your home — and could do the same in your mind. ‘By simplifying your life early in retirement, you’re not only freeing up space in your home, but you’re able to take your time to examine what’s most meaningful to you and release anything that no longer serves you,’ said Penny Gordon, senior vice president and private wealth adviser at Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust in East Berlin, Penn. Having a clean slate is just as important as getting your financial house in order, she said (and it could make downsizing homes in the future easier, too). The items that no longer mean much to you may mean a great deal to a family member, friend or charity organization, Gordon added. Some may want to follow Marie Kondo’s method of decluttering, where she puts everything of one category (such as clothes, books or linens) on the floor and picks them up one by one to see which “spark joy” and which don’t. When something is no longer important, you’re supposed to thank the item for its time and find a new place for it (outside of your life).

Know your benefits. Educate yourself on what your company gives you in retirement, including how your retirement accounts are invested and if you get any health benefits. About a quarter of employers who provide health insurance also offer some sort of financial help with medical needs (though that share of employers used to be a lot higher — 60% in the 1980s). Along with what employers offer, it’s important to know what the government will give you. Social Security benefit checks are expected to shrink in a few decades, because there are more people currently retiring than there are people entering the workforce. If you haven’t already, create an account with the Social Security Administration at My Social Security to ensure work history and personal information is current, view Social Security benefit statements or see what you should expect to receive in the future.”

Read more at 9 New Year’s Resolutions for the Nearly Retired.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: How to Plan for a Manageable Move

Baby Boomer Couple with Moving Professionals

According to the advice in the AARP article How to Plan for a Manageable Move, the first step is to decide what to take and what to leave:

Here’s how to start:

Step 1. Ask your loved one to name the six possessions that are dearest — not most needed or most valuable. Jewelry and anything smaller doesn’t count. Perhaps it’s the blanket your mom wrapped around her newborn babies, or the bureau handhewn by your dad’s grandfather. The chosen items are keepers.

Step 2. You’ll need six sticky-note pads in different colors, a marker and at least six boxes per room and per closet. Label them Move, Sell, Toss, Donate, Up for Grabs and Pass Along.

Step 3. Start with the least-used rooms — that’s where most of us stash the stuff we like the least.

– Before going in, try to agree to get rid of anything that is broken, cracked or worn out, unless it is an heirloom.

Read the rest of the steps at How to Plan for a Manageable Move.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a real estate agent I have been working with homebuyers and sellers throughout the East Bay communities of Layfayette, Moraga, Orinda and Walnut Creek since 2009. As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582