Toss It Tuesday – How to Downsize Your Wardrobe

Pile of Cluttered ClothesIn her article How To Declutter Your Wardrobe: Tips for Simplifying Closets & Clothes, author Laura Norcross is a twenty-something who offers great advice for folks of any age who want to downsize the their clothing closets.

How to Declutter Your Wardrobe – Questions To Ask Yourself:

“What do I wear on a day to day basis?” Jeans? Leggings? Suits? Dresses? Pajamas? If you work in a garden every day, you probably won’t need many dressy clothes. If you work in a corporate office five days a week, you may need more business casual attire than other people, but less clothes for lounging around.

“What is the weather like year-round?” Is there a cold winter? Do you have one great, thick winter coat and one coat that you can wear for spring and fall? Or do you have five winter coats? Do you really need five winter coats? Boots? Or do you live in the desert year-round?

“Do I work out?” You might need a couple workout clothes on hand. Do you play sports? Can you get away with having the same two or three outfits for workouts?

“Do I really need four pairs of gloves?” You probably don’t.  And you probably don’t need four black t-shirts either. This concept can apply to every type of item you own (gym shoes, scarves, coats, jeans, sweatshirts, etc.).

“How often do I have to do laundry?” This is huge. Laundry habits affect how often clothes need to be worn. How often can you wear clothes before they’re considered ‘dirty’?

Read more: Actions for Simplifying your Clothes.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: How to Hire a Moving Company – Part One

Two Seniors Holding Moving Boxes

If you, or an aging loved one, are planning on moving, think about hiring movers to do the work for you. Moving companies reduce the stress of the moving process by transporting your belongings to your new place.  Some local movers specialize in ‘small moves’, great for seniors moving to senior living. Here are three tips for hiring a moving company:

1) Get referrals. If your family, friends or coworkers had a great experiene with a moving company, chances are you will, too. Ask around for names of two or three companies to consider. Be sure to get estimates for each.

2) Research online. Once you have your list of referred companies, research them online to make sure they are legitimate. Visit the American Moving Association’s website (moving.org) to see if the company is a member. Membership is voluntary and requires that members abide by the organization’s guidelines. Check review sites and social media to see what their customers say about them and if the companies have a history of customer complaints. Also, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration website (fmcsa.dot.gov) and type in each company’s USDOT number to see if they are licensed and insured.

3) Get estimates in person. Many professionals may offer an estimate based on the number of rooms in a home; however, insist on an in-home estimate. Be sure to show them everything you want moved, including furniture, boxes and items that have not been packed yet so they can estimate the weight accurately.

If you’re moving to another state, ask for a written binding estimate or a binding not-to-exceed estimate, which will put a limit on what you will be expected to pay. If you’re moving within your state, the rules about estimates will vary by state. Visit your state’s website to learn more.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: AARP Travel Research: Baby Boomers 2017 Travel Trends

Baby Boomer Couple Relaxing in Swimming Pool

According to AARP, almost all Boomers will travel for leisure in 2017, taking an average of 5 trips.

Top 2017 Boomer travel trends show that almost all will travel for leisure with about half traveling internationally.

Key findings include the following:

  • Most Boomers are looking for a laid back and relaxing trip to give them the opportunity to spend quality time with friends and family.
  • To do so, Boomers are planning to escape to Mexico, the Caribbean, and/or the British Isles (UK, Ireland) for their upcoming international trips. Their domestic trips, although covering a variety of cities, are most often being planned for a Florida or California destination.
  • Regarding authentic experiences, although Boomers would like to eat a meal with locals (50%), or tour with locals (40% among international travelers), they are not as open to staying with locals, domestically or abroad (18%).
  • As seen in past research, among Boomers who are still working, approximately 40% do not anticipate taking all of their vacation days. And when they do vacation, 40% feel it is at least somewhat important to stay connected to work while away, which is why many anticipate spending at least 10% of their vacation time working.

Read the rest at AARP.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Transition Thursday: Baby Boomers Redefine Retirement

Baby Boomer Couple Dancing

In his Forbes article “The Most Frightening Yet Most Important Retirement Rule That Baby Boomers Still Need To Break,” contributor Robert Laura explains how the Baby Boomer generation is re-defining retirement:

“Boomers are ushering in a late-stage era of life, where they have 10-20 more years of productive and capable working years when compared to previous generations. Furthermore, they have the resources, knowledge, and collective desire to cause dramatic shifts in the way retirement is both defined and lived.

It’s easy to see the undercurrent of this happening as research suggests that baby boomers are more likely to start a business than any other generation right now.  Furthermore, a growing segment of them are worn-out from years of the corporate grind and don’t feel the connection between their job and the people it impacts outside their office walls or company grounds.  They’re shifting their focus from accumulating a giant nest egg to a desire to be part of something bigger and better… to have a positive effect on others… and don’t necessarily want to retire from work, rather they just want to work in the right situation and retirement.

In the past, retirement was defined as freedom from the workplace.  Now boomers are redefining it as freedom in the workplace.”

Read the rest at Forbes.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Baby Boomer Fitness Trends

Senior couple riding bicycles

In her Next Avenue article Boomers Took Fitness and Made It Their Own, author Lynn Langway explains how exercisers who are over the age of 50 are reshaping the fitness industry.

“Clearly, the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) was onto something when its annual survey listed “programs for older adults” among the top 20 fitness trends for 2017.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 32 percent of older adults get no physical exercise whatsoever in their leisure time.

‘Your aging body starts calling out for more balanced workouts,’ says Grace DeSimone, a spokesperson for ACSM and group instructor at the Wyckoff Family YMCA in Wyckoff, N.J. ‘Strength and flexibility become major factors.'”

We can’t help getting older, but we can age successfully. The more active, healthy, and fit you are now, the better you will feel as you get older.

Expert Tips for No-Sweat Workouts

To keep yourself moving with minimum risk of injury, follow these tips from two certified trainers who are boomers themselves:

  • “Watch before you do,” counsels YMCA instructor DeSimone. Talk to trainers about the class schedule, and observe classes that interest you.
  • Don’t skimp on warm-ups. “You’ve got to oil up the Tin Man,” says DeSimone.
  • Talk to the teacher before you take a class. Let him or her know about any injuries or limitations. Ask how to modify movements to suit your abilities, suggests Regina Jordan, who teaches free classes at community centers in Manhattan that are run by the Health Advocates for Older People .
  • Listen to your body. If jumping jacks or other movements give you twinges, Jordan says, “don’t do them if they don’t feel comfortable.”
  • Learn to custom-tailor your workouts. Many gyms offer a free consultation to start. You may be able to continue workouts you like if you adjust the intensity: use lighter weights, spin at a lower gear on your bike, replace jumps with side-steps, add shorter bursts of intense activity.
  • Vary what you do. Don’t take multiple spinning or zumba classes in a row; alternate.
  • Practice everyday exercise. Walk to as many errands as possible, lift groceries with proper form, take the stairs when you can.

Read more about Baby Boomers Fitness Trends.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Toss It Tuesday – How to Downsize a Lifetime of Your Parents’ Stuff

Cluttered RoomHelping your parents downsize their home could be one of the hardest things you ever do, both emotionally and practically speaking. There are decades of belongings to contend with, not to mention the inherent tension of an adult child/elderly parent relationship.

Not to worry, though. Help is here, thanks to grandparents.com. These ideas can help you simplify downsizing, while remaining sensitive to all involved parties. Most importantly, everyone needs to recognize it’s a process. “You can’t downsize a 40-year-old household in 48 hours,” says Mary Kay Buysse, the Executive Director for the National Association of Senior Move Managers (NASMM). “You have to give it the dignity it deserves.”

Idea – Encourage parents to downsize before they need to. Your parents shouldn’t wait too long to edit their possessions; the earlier they begin, the more they can participate and even find joy in the process. “The best time to do it is while they’re healthy,” says Andy Cohen, CEO of Caring.com. “You’d much rather [downsize] when they’re of sound mind and body. You can say, ‘If you do this now, you’re going to be able to do this the way you want to do it.'”

“You don’t want to do it after they’ve developed dementia or a stroke,” Buysse concurs. “You don’t want to do it for them; you want to do it with them.”

Idea – Start in a low-stakes room. Determined to DIY? While it may be tempting to tackle the most sentimental items first, it’s better to take the opposite approach. “One of the best things to do is go through a room that doesn’t have any real personal attachment—the medicine cabinet, the linen closet, the kitchen,” says Buysse. Cleaning out moisturizers or old towels is easy, comparatively speaking, and rewards parents with instant gratification, plus motivation to move forward themselves. “What happens is, they love the way the kitchen or medicine cabinets look, and they get inspired. They don’t need coaxing.”

Whatever you do, save pictures and albums for later. “I think our gut instinct is to begin with photos, and that’s the last thing that should be touched,” says Buysse. “It’s also the easiest thing that can be handed off to a third party to digitize.”

Idea – Ditch multiples and seldom-used items. Though it seems like every little possession could spark a toss/keep debate, there’s one category of stuff you can chuck immediately: “Multiples, for sure.” Duplicate tools, clothes, and cooking equipment can go with nary a second thought. “Most 80 year old women haven’t made mashed potatoes in 10 years, and they have three mashers,” says Buysse.

For seldom-used items you’re less sure about, try this test: “Whether it’s an article of clothing or kitchen utensil, if you haven’t picked it up in a year, chances are you can live without it.” From cookie sheets to bedsheets, if the downsizing person finds herself in need of an item down the line, it can probably be purchased new relatively quickly. “Very few things can’t be replaced easily,” says Buysse, “but everything else you can pretty much get an Amazon drone to bring later in the day.”

Read more downsizing ideas.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Moving Mom Monday: Moving My Kicking-And-Screaming Elderly Parents 1,600 Miles To Be With Me

Elderly Couple Walking Along Beach

Arlene Nisson Lassin writes about her experience of moving her elderly parents 1600 miles to Houston, Texas…a trip her Mom and Dad did not want to make.  But first, a brief history:

“I moved 1,600 miles away from my parents to Houston as a young adult. As their generation aged, and our other relatives scattered, I became increasingly worried about them being there still, somewhat isolated, without a close family member looking after them. They lived in their aging home all by themselves and tried mightily to keep it up.

Fortunately, my dad was a robustly healthy, mentally sharp man into his mid-eighties and he still drove a car, managed his household, cared for his wife. Being a social guy and wanting something to do with his time, for many years he worked as a greeter and mascot for a local grocery store part time up until the past couple of months. It gave him a place to go, something to do, and pocket change.

When you live far away from your elderly parents, you are always walking on eggshells, dreading a phone call of illness or injury. I got that call this winter – having just turned 87 years old, my dad had taken a tumble down the stairs of his house. The strong ox that he used to be dissipated with this accident, and he felt frail, vulnerable, and shaky enough where he didn’t want to drive any more.”

Read more about the process Arlene experienced moving her elderly parents to Houston.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Freedom Friday: R.V. Life – Baby Boomers Are Hitting the Road

Baby boomer senior couple in front of RV

In the article R.V. Life: Getting Kicks at Age 66, author J. Peder Zane explains how the R.V. landscape has changed considerably in the last decade because of new technologies and the active lifestyle embraced by baby boomers.

“Jim and Jaylene Myers knew exactly what they wanted to do when they retired: Go wherever whim and chance might take them in their 45-foot recreational vehicle.

The Myerses are members of a high-octane tribe of retirees who are transforming their golden years into a golden age of adventure on the open road. Inspired by disparate strands of the American way of life – from don’t-tread-on-me individualism to an it-takes-a-village communitarianism, from a love of nature to a craving for the best creature comforts modernity can offer (or both) – they are a wildly diverse bunch.

The best estimates say 750,000 to one million retirees call R.V.s home, according to Kevin Broom, director of media relations for the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association. He said independent studies suggested their ranks were growing. Although the recession took a toll on sales of new R.V.s, the number of R.V. owners 55 and older increased 20 percent, to 3.6 million, from 2005 through 2011.”

Read the rest at The New York Times.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Transition Thursday: Baby Boomer Parents: Your Grown Children Don’t Want Your Stuff

Baby Boomer couple with moving box

In her article “Boomer parents: ‘One day, this will all be yours.’ Grown children: ‘Noooo!’ ” Samantha Bronkar, staff writer at the Christian Science Monitor, relays the message that the grown children of downsizing baby boomers parents don’t want their  collections of stuff.

“As baby boomers begin to downsize, they are discovering their grown children do not want their stuff. In fact, they recoil in something close to horror at the thought of trying to find room for collections of Hummels and Thomas Kinkade paintings.

Two hundred stuffed animals, two violins, and a 7-1/2 foot-tall Christmas tree: That was just a corner of the possessions Rosalie and Bill Kelleher accumulated over their 47-year marriage. And, they realized, it was about 199 stuffed animals more than their two grown children wanted.

Going from a four-bedroom house in New Bedford, Mass. – with an attic stuffed full of paper stacked four-feet tall – to a 1,300-square-foot apartment took six years of winnowing, sorting, shredding, and shlepping stuff to donation centers.

Among the possessions the Kellehers are keeping are three hutches – one that belonged to his mother, one that belonged to her mother, and one that they purchased together 35 years ago. One shelf is carefully lined with teacups Rosalie collected during her world travels. Another houses a delicate tea set from Japan, a gift her mother received on her wedding day.

‘We really don’t need them,’ she admits.”

Neither do their kids.

Read the rest at The Christian Science Monitor

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582

Wellness Wednesday – Exercise Tips for Seniors

Senior couple riding bicycles

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration on Aging estimates that by 2030 there will be 72.1 million people over the age of 65 – 19% of the population. By 2040, the number of people 85 and older is expected to reach 14.1 million!

We can’t help getting older, but we can age successfully. The more active, healthy, and fit you are now, the better you will feel as you get older.

It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise is an important key to aging successfully. It’s never too late to start. Here are some tips on how to get started on your fitness journey.

1. How do I get started? Before starting any exercise program, talk to your doctor to find out what activities are right for you. It’s important to start slowly, and build gradually. Doing too much, too soon can result in injury. Even a five-to-ten minute walk is a good starting place, and you can build from there. Motivate yourself with goals.

2. Make a weekly exercise plan. Schedule your exercise and you will be more likely to stick with it. Be consistent, and find the times and days that work best for you to get started. It doesn’t matter how much you do in the beginning – just get out there and do it!

3. Endurance and aerobic exercises. Any activity that increases heart rate and breathing for an extended period is considered endurance exercise. Endurance and aerobic exercises are good for your heart, lungs, and the circulatory system. Endurance gives you stamina for daily tasks, and can prevent many aging-related diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Walking, running, cycling, swimming, aerobics classes, and tennis are all types of endurance exercise. Many gyms and senior centers offer exercise classes for seniors. Endurance exercise does not have to be strenuous to be beneficial.

4. Strength and resistance exercises. Strength exercises will make you not only stronger, they will help you remain able to perform daily tasks, and they can increase metabolism allowing you to maintain a healthy weight. Strength exercises also play a role in keeping blood sugar levels healthy, which is important in preventing diabetes and obesity. Strength and resistance training may also help prevent osteoporosis by helping you maintain strong bones. Resistance bands are an easy and inexpensive way to perform strength exercises at home. You can also use free weights, or machines at the gym.

Read more Exercise Tips for Seniors.

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DAYNA WILSON: As a Certified Senior Housing Professional (CSHP) , I have special knowledge about everything from reverse mortgages to the importance of universal design. I can tap into my network and put you in touch with my team of qualified home inspectors, movers, attorneys, CPAs, organizers and other experts. I have all the resources and knowledge to simplify the transaction and eliminate the anxiety of selling your home.

Call me today to talk about your real estate concerns. I’m here to listen: 925.788.6582